Moving Mountains

 

You may ask what is interesting about the photograph at the top of this post. It is, after all, a view out of a Chinese factory window. The buildings are of a typically functional, brutal style found all over industrial China, and there’s a small hillock covered in trees in the distance. It is a very fortunate hill, as I will explain later. The reason this image is extraordinary is not because of what’s on the ground, but what’s above it: clouds, visible ones, against a soft blue sky. Not so extraordinary, I can imagine you are thinking? Well, I can tell you that clear skies are a something of a rarity here. The heavens are often hidden by a heavy blanket of yellowish smog, so it’s a happy day when we get an unencumbered view of the sun, even for a short while.

I have started and not finished many posts about the natural enviroment in southern China. The reason I have not completed them is that I have found the topic rather depressing, and I dislike being gratuitously negative even when the topic offers little to be positive about. However I am seeing signs of improvement. Yes, most development here is ugly, bordering on grotesque when viewed through western eyes, but developers are finally clocking on to the fact that the increasingly wealthy Chinese want to live and work somewhere green and leafy, with decent air quality.

 

Songshan Lake, China, Oct 2016

I have been staying on the shores of Songshan lake in Dalang, Dongguan for the last 10 days. The area around the lake is designated a high-tech industrial park and is laced with wide boulevards lined with trees. They are as generous and well landscaped as any in the world. The trees are transplanted at a size which would be unthinkable (and unaffordable) in the UK, but thanks to the subtropical climate they race away and look established in next to no time. Behind this green screen, mammouth company headquarters and industrial buildings are springing up beneath a dense forest of cranes. It’s progress, but of a much more considered and sensitive nature than what’s gone before. I hope it’s a sign of what we can expect from China in the future.

So, back to my obscure hill, or “mountain” as it might be referred to here.  I describe it as fortunate because hills do not pose much of an obstacle to development in these parts. In fact there used to be a lot more hills where the flashy new buildings reflected in Songshan Lake now stand. What became of them? Well, they were simply removed. Today alone I counted over twenty hills that were in the process of being flattened: maybe “tactically relocated” would be a more palatable way of putting it. These wooded pimples on the thick skin of progress are regarded as little more than an inconvenience. They are shaved away at vertically, like a pudding on Christmas Day, until nothing remains to stop the march of concrete, steel and glass across the landscape.

Despite all of this I am still woken by birdsong each morning. Between my balcony and the the lake there are dense groves of glossy green trees which extend around the shore. Quite how many more birds there might have been before the building of the hotel I don’t know. I am quite certain that no amount of flora, fauna or shady hillocks were going to stop it being constructed. However, if future urban development goes hand-in-hand with sensitive landscaping it will be better for China, the Chinese and the world at large, attracting more visitors and more businesses to come and work, rest and play, together under a bluer sky.

Note: For those of you wondering where I have been, now you know! WordPress and other social media are restricted in China, hence I have been quieter than normal for the last fortnight. I’ll be back to normal soon. TFG.

 

Songshan Lake, China, Oct 2016

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